Fatigue and Traumatic Brain Injury – Model Systems Knowledge Transitions Center

“Fatigue is a feeling of exhaustion, tiredness, weariness or lack of energy. After a Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), you may have more than one kind of fatigue.”

Couples’ Relationships After Traumatic Brain Injury – Model Systems Knowledge Transitions Center

“After Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), many couples find that their relationship with each other changes dramatically. These changes are very personal and can be very emotional for both people in the relationship. This fact sheet will help couples understand some of the common changes they may notice in their relationship after TBI. Also, suggestions are given for ways that couples can address some of the more difficult changes they are experiencing.”

Returning to School After a Traumatic Brain Injury – Model Systems Knowledge Transitions Center

“Parental involvement is critical when a young person is returning to school after a Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). Parents have the most knowledge about their child and are deeply invested in their daughter’s or son’s well-being and future. Often parents become advocates to ensure that all essential supports are in place to enhance their child’s successful return to school. Parents may also be a go-between to make sure all the necessary medical information has been provided so the school can design the best plan for the student. If the student is close to exiting school, vocational rehabilitation professionals may also be involved.”

Brain Injury Association of Tasmania

The Brain Injury Association of Tasmania “plays a key role in activities that contribute to a community that is more informed about acquired brain injury and has a strong focus on the area of advocacy with an emphasis on representation and support of the ABI Sector.”

My Adult Child has a Brain Injury – The Acquired Brain Injury Outreach Service (ABIOS)

“Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) can be a devastating experience for the parents of an injured adult child. Parents say they have had no time to prepare for the many changes that occur to their lives as a result of their son/daughter’s brain injury. Often, now that their family have grown, parents are at the stage of planning for their own future. It seems that life and those plans disappear in an instant.”

My Partner has a Brain Injury – The Acquired Brain Injury Outreach Service (ABIOS)

“Acquired Brain Injury can be a devastating experience for spouses and partners. There is no time to adjust gradually to the injury and nothing can prepare people for the changes that occur. It is common to feel that the ABI is unfair and that the injury and its consequences are undeserved. Life plans can disappear in an instant.”

My Sibling has a Brain Injury – The Acquired Brain Injury Outreach Service (ABIOS)

“Brain Injury not only affects the individual, but it affects the family as a whole. In the process of recovery parents may be preoccupied with the medical crisis and the experiences of siblings are often not recognised. This is a significant and stressful time for brothers and sisters because the sudden and confusing changes caused by the ABI can greatly influence family life. Siblings can be affected in many ways, sometimes for many years after the injury. Understanding how each has been affected by this experience is important to facilitate adjustment to the new situation.”

“Hospitalised Assault Injuries Among Women and Girls” – Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

The “head and neck” was the body region most often injured (59%) in hospitalised cases of assault on women and girls.

Traumatic Brain Injury as a Result of Domestic Violence: Information, Screening and Model Practices Trainer’s Guide (US)

“This Trainer’s Guide was created by the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Domestic Violence (PCADV) in the United States, as a “tool to educate and prepare domestic violence programs and advocates to enhance domestic violence advocacy services and skills,” when brain injury is involved.”

“Do-It-Yourself (DIY) Injuries” – Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

Head and neck injuries accounted for 19% of hospitalised do-it-yourself (DIY) fall-related injuries sustained around the home, and 7% of DIY injuries were brain injuries.

The Evidence-Based Review of Moderate To Severe Acquired Brain Injury (ERABI)

“The Evidence-Based Review of Moderate To Severe Acquired Brain Injury (ERABI) is a joint project to develop an evidence-based review of the literature for rehabilitation or rehabilitation-related interventions for acquired brain injury (ABI). The principle of the ERABI is to improve the quality of ABI rehabilitation by synthesizing the current literature into a utilizable format and laying the foundation for effective knowledge transfer to improve programs and services.”

University at Buffalo Concussion Management Clinic (US)

“Our internationally recognized experts are the most experienced in Western New York for treating patients with sports-related concussion, traumatic brain injuries and various concussion symptoms through the development of research, care, baseline testing, treatment and a safe return-to-activity program that fits the individual.” Professor Barry S Willer, Director of Research at the University at Buffalo Concussion Management Clinic, has presented on concussion at Brain Injury Australia events.

University of Pittsburg Medicine Center Sports Medicine Concussion Program (US)

“The first of its kind when it opened its doors in 2000, the University of Pittsburg Medicine Center Sports Medicine Concussion Program is a global leader in testing, treating, and researching sports-related concussions.”

Out of Calamity: Stories of Trauma Survivors by Roger Rees (2011)

“Out of Calamity: Stories of Trauma Survivors is a book of portraits of people and their families who have experienced and endured severe brain trauma with dignity, courage, humour and resilience.” The author is Roger Rees, Emeritus Professor of Disability Studies and Research in the School of Medicine at Flinders University, Adelaide. For twenty five years he has managed a rehabilitation and educational consultancy for people experiencing neurological injury and trauma.”

Traumatic Brain Injury Survival Guide by Dr Glen Johnson (2010)

“Nearly all of the survivors of a traumatic head injury and their families with whom I have worked have had one complaint: There is nothing written that explains head injury in clear, easy to understand language. Most say the available material is too medical or too difficult to read.” Dr Glen Johnson, Clinical Neuropsychologist

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) – For Parents and Carers

This resource, produced by the National Organization for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (NOFASD), the “national peak organisation representing the interests of individuals and families living with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD)”, aims to assist parents and carers to understand the challenges that children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) can have.

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) – Myths Exposed

This resource, produced by the National Organization for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (NOFASD), the “national peak organisation representing the interests of individuals and families living with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD)”, aims to expose the common myths associated with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD).

Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Care of People Living with Traumatic Brain Injury in the Community (2004)

“This comprehensive book (2004) is designed to accompany a smaller quick reference version summarizing the best available evidence about the longer term care of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI).”

Brain Tumour Ahoy Hoy (BTAH)

“A registered charity that supports awareness, information, research, hope, positivity, humour and advocacy for people who are affected by Brain Tumours.”

Functional Independence Measure (FIM)

The abilities of a patient change during rehabilitation. The Functional Independence Measure (FIM) instrument is used to track if those changes in ability result in severe disability.

Guidelines for the Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (2007)

Guidelines for the Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury, published by the Brain Trauma Foundation (2007).

Position Statement on Brain Injury by the United Kingdom Acquired Brain Injury Forum (2016-2017)

Position Statements on brain injury by the United Kingdom Acquired Brain Injury Forum (UKABIF) (2016-2017). “There are several areas which UKABIF sees as being crucial to improve the lives of people with acquired brain injuries. UKABIF has developed position statements for these which are listed below and may be used by the media as required.”

National Athletic Trainers’ Association Position Statement: Management of Sport Concussion (US, 2014)

“The best approach to concussion management involves the entire sports medicine team.”

Concussion, Mild Traumatic Brain Injury, and the Team Physician (US, 2011)

“This document, published in 2011, provides an overview of select medical issues that are important to team physicians responsible for athletes with concussion.”

Position Statement on Traumatic Brain Injury by the Demographics and Clinical Assessment Working Group (UK, 2010)

Position Statement on Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) by the Demographics and Clinical Assessment Working Group of the International and Interagency Initiative Toward Common Data Elements for Research on Traumatic Brain Injury and Psychological Health. “In this article, we discuss criteria for considering or establishing a diagnosis of TBI, with a particular focus on the problems how a diagnosis of TBI can be made when patients present late after injury and how mild TBI may be differentiated from non-TBI causes with similar symptoms. Technologic advances in magnetic resonance imaging and the development of biomarkers offer potential for improving diagnostic accuracy in these situations.”

Position Papers by Brain Injury Association of America (2006-2017)

“The Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA) publishes position papers on topics of concern to the brain injury field. The papers are authored by experts, include full citations and are approved by BIAA’s Board of Directors prior to publication. The position papers have been endorsed by, referenced in policy statements and/or reprinted by other organizations. The papers are intended for general audiences.”

Hartley Lifecare (Australian Capital Territory)

“Hartley Lifecare is a Canberra-based organisation that has provided accommodation support and respite care for children, adults and their families in the ACT and region with physical and complex disabilities.”

Friends of Brain Injured Children (Australian Capital Territory)

Friends of Brain Injured Children, based in the Australian Capital Territory, “encourages the use of a wide range of early intensive therapies, and provides families of children with brain injury with support, information and financial assistance for therapy.”

Somerville Community Services (Northern Territory)

Somerville, based in the Northern Territory, aims to improve “on the dignity and quality of life of people affected by social and economic disadvantage.”

Assistive Technology Australia

“Assistive technology (AT) is any device, system, or design used by individuals to perform functions that might otherwise be difficult or impossible. Such technology may be something as simple as your common household items such as a carrot peeler to the more complex products such as pressure care mattress for the prevention of pressure sores. Assistive Technology Australia is a leading information, education, and advisory centre for Assistive Technology and the Built Environment.”